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s-c-i-guy:

Amazingly Vivid Dino Illustrations Reveal a Brutal Prehistoric World

Over its lifetime, Earth has hosted countless species. But some of those species, like the dinosaurs, have managed to claw their way into a special place in our imaginations. Now, a new book illustrates the dinosaurs — and many of the beasts of millennia ago — in beautiful, spectacular and vicious style.

In one illustration, tiny Utahraptors tear at the flesh of a much larger creature. Another shows a rather unlikely but fanciful encounter between giant megalodon and funny-looking platybelodon. A more serene image depicts a well-camouflaged little dinosaur sleeping beneath a tree in a lush, green forest.

The Paleoart of Julius Csotonyi, available on May 20, is a collection of artwork by Julius Csotonyi, an award-winning illustrator whose work lives in museums and in science papers. Csotonyi, who holds a PhD in microbiology, works frequently with paleontologists who need help bringing their fossil finds to life. Sometimes, though, he draws whatever comes to mind. According to Csotonyi’s parents, his first illustration, at age 3, was of a dinosaur. “It appears to have been intended to be a rooster,” Csotonyi says in the book.

source

fucktonofanatomyreferences:

A helpful fuck-ton of dinosaur drawing references (per request).

There are too many dinosaurs to pinpoint…. I recommend watching the movie “Dinosaur,” which is a horribly shitty movie, in itself (I like bad movies, so I don’t mind as much), but the animation is phenomenal for dinosaur references. (Don’t let the date of release fool you; it’s still one of the best dinosaur movies for animation depiction, honestly and truly. Just get past the first few scenes with the lemurs. “Lemurs??” Don’t ask… just fast-forward and draw.) See:

movie (14954) Animated Gif on Giphy

They talk, too… “Really? They’re talking dinosa—” I know, I know! Just, please…

 Hopefully this helps to some degree. Enjoy.

image

Sourced by no15201:


http://www.deviantart.com/art/Tyrannosaurus-growth-series-343670202

http://droemar.deviantart.com/art/Raptor-Tutorial-76763650

http://droemar.deviantart.com/art/Theropod-Tutorial-77166672

http://carolzilla.deviantart.com/art/Carol-Dinosaur-tutorial-part-1-106209990

http://carolzilla.deviantart.com/art/Carol-Dinosaur-tutorial-part-2-106737032

http://dinopharaoh.deviantart.com/art/Dinosaur-Feet-TUTORIAL-part-1-274387077

http://press.princeton.edu/titles/9287.html

http://gspauldino.com

http://www.johnsibbick.com

http://gspauldino.com

the-science-llama:

sagansense:

We Live in a Cosmic Shooting Gallery

Early in the morning on February 15 a 55-foot meteor entered Earth’s atmosphere undetected. The resulting explosion — estimated to have the strength of 25 Hiroshimas — woke a lot of people up.

That is to say, the meteor created a shock wave that injured 1,200 people in the Chelyabinsk region of Russia, but the psychological shock was felt globally. How could this meteor, the biggest to strike Earth since 1908, have gone undetected? Who was asleep at the switch?

We all were, says astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, author of Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier. After all, scientists have been warning the public for decades that we are not the safe small blue dot we like to think we are, but rather, we are more like a target in a “cosmic shooting gallery.”

Did you know, for instance, that four small asteroids (although one was the size of a city block) just passed by us in the last week alone? Some of these asteroids were only discovered a few days before they buzzed by. That’s not a lot of lead time to build an arc or stock your apocalypse-proof shelter with Twinkies and ammo.

In all seriousness, if we don’t want to go the way of the dinosaurs, we need to wake up to the reality of this threat. As Neil deGrasse Tyson points out in the video above, even if you are living on the other side of the planet from the site of impact, a big enough collision could “send a wave of extinction across the tree of life.”

How different are humans from the dinosaurs that perished from the asteroid that hit the Yucatán peninsula?

“I’m a little embarrassed for us,” Tyson tells Big Think. Unlike the dinosaurs, we have a space program. And yet, Tyson says we are still “so blind to everything experts have been telling us.” Tyson points to The New Yorker cartoon by Frank Cotham in which one dinosaur says to another, “All I’m saying is now is the time to develop the technology to deflect an asteroid.”

As Tyson points out, unlike the dinosaurs, “we can do something about it if people have the foresight to understand what the risks are, the dangers, and actually act upon it.”

It’s kind of sad that this is what it takes ins’t it?
But hey, don’t worry Neil, I got you! I found that cartoon.

did-you-kno:

Source

Uh, how about you make a bit less wild claims? The source clearly states that a third of classified dinosaur species are wrongly identified as seperate species while they may have been juveniles of larger animals, and that a third is likely an overly exaggerated count. What you’re doing is making it sound as if paleontologists have been lying about the number of dinosaurs they’ve been discovering.

crownedrose:

Vandals smash duck-billed dinosaur fossil to pieces in Alberta.

GRANDE PRAIRIE, Alta. - Paleontologists were thrilled when they found the fossilized remains of a duck-billed dinosaur in northwestern Alberta last month.
But joy turned quickly to despair when they returned to the site near the Red Willow River a few days ago and found that vandals had smashed the Hadrosaur skeleton to pieces.
The Pipestone Creek Dinosaur Initiative says the fossil was discovered by paleontologist Phil Bell and a University of Alberta team on June 15.
They partially prepared it for removal, then reburied it for protection until it could be fully removed later this month.
Full article continues here

WOAH, not cool. I hope they find the people who did this, because this is a very serious manner. I feel for the palaeontologists and other workers who spent all their time beginning the long process to recover these fossils. Digging out bones and sometimes having to leave them for up to a whole year is excruciating because of this fact. You never want to put yourself in this position, but a lot of the time it’s out of their hands. All you can do is hope no one else knows of the remains and that you did a good job of camouflaging the fossils until you can get back out in the field.
This really is beyond upsetting. Fossils are extremely important for our understanding of past ecosystems, and every bone is precious; each one unique. Not to mention this skeleton was going to be an exhibit at a new museum. Tons of people - children to professionals - could have benefited greatly from this find.

D:
Zoom Info
Camera
Olympus TG-810
ISO
100
Aperture
f/3.9
Exposure
1/100th
Focal Length
5mm

crownedrose:

Vandals smash duck-billed dinosaur fossil to pieces in Alberta.

GRANDE PRAIRIE, Alta. - Paleontologists were thrilled when they found the fossilized remains of a duck-billed dinosaur in northwestern Alberta last month.

But joy turned quickly to despair when they returned to the site near the Red Willow River a few days ago and found that vandals had smashed the Hadrosaur skeleton to pieces.

The Pipestone Creek Dinosaur Initiative says the fossil was discovered by paleontologist Phil Bell and a University of Alberta team on June 15.

They partially prepared it for removal, then reburied it for protection until it could be fully removed later this month.

Full article continues here

WOAH, not cool. I hope they find the people who did this, because this is a very serious manner. I feel for the palaeontologists and other workers who spent all their time beginning the long process to recover these fossils. Digging out bones and sometimes having to leave them for up to a whole year is excruciating because of this fact. You never want to put yourself in this position, but a lot of the time it’s out of their hands. All you can do is hope no one else knows of the remains and that you did a good job of camouflaging the fossils until you can get back out in the field.

This really is beyond upsetting. Fossils are extremely important for our understanding of past ecosystems, and every bone is precious; each one unique. Not to mention this skeleton was going to be an exhibit at a new museum. Tons of people - children to professionals - could have benefited greatly from this find.

D:

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