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aliveagaintoday:

priceofliberty:

Video Shows Pittsburgh Cop Punching Teen At Gay Pride In An Apparent Use Of Excessive Force

A video showing a Pittsburgh Police officer using what appears to be excessive force on a 19-year-old Pittsburgh PrideFest attendee, has sparked outrage online after it was shared on Facebook late Sunday afternoon.

According to eyewitness Autumn Huntera, the incident occurred around 5 o’clock Sunday afternoon. Huntera explains that the teen engaged in a heated debate with a group of anti-gay protesters attending the Pride festival: “She was saying that being gay is not a sin and that she was a lesbian and proud of it, and that she wasn’t going to hell for it.”

Huntera detailed her account of the incident for us:

The girl was debating with one of the protesters, and she stepped closer without even realizing it and the officer ran over to her. He grabbed her by the back of her neck, pulled her over, dropped her on the ground, pulled her up by her hair, and said “Do you want me to hit you.” When she didn’t respond, he hit her in stomach area about 4 or 5 times repeatedly. After everyone yelled at him, he hand cuffed her, put her against a wall. She was crying against a wall next to her ‘attacker’ while her fiancee was panicking trying to find someone who recorded it.

Huntera adds that the protester and teen were about a foot apart when the officer grabbed her without prior warning.

Please signal boost, the news stations in the area are NOT giving it much airtime or writing articles about it, so we need to spread the word.

Pittsburgh cops are known for being super corrupt and I won’t be surprised if nothing comes of this and he walks away a free man. DONT LET THAT HAPPEN

serenity2132:

justsayins:

owlmylove:

FRIENDLY FUCKIN’ REMINDER: WHAT WE CALL "THE TONY AWARDS" WAS ORIGINALLY "THE ANTOINETTE PERRY AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN THEATRE", NAMED AFTER THE CO-FOUNDER AND CHAIRWOMAN OF THE AMERICAN THEATRE WING.

THE AWARDS FOR ACTRESSES WERE ORIGINALLY SILVER COMPACTS, BUT SOMEONE DECIDED THIS WAS TOO EFFEMINATE AND SLAPPED THE COMPACT’S DESIGN IN THE MIDDLE OF OUR MODERN AWARD- THAT SPINNY SILVER MEDALLION WAS ORIGINALLY USED FOR CHECKING LIPSTICK.

ANOTHER REMINDER: I KNEW NONE OF THIS UNTIL TODAY. DON’T TOLERATE FEMALE ERASURE. REMEMBER HER NAME.

ANTOINETTE FUCKING PERRY.

Just so you know, I’ve decided to start spelling/calling it the Toni Awards.

It’d be cool if that caught on.

BADASS LADY BOOST GO!

Hugo Schwyzer is not your feminist hero.

aka14kgold:

hythmknwy:

Okay so following these articles in which Ubisoft defended their lack of representation in the upcoming Assassin’s Creed: Unity with “a female character…would have doubled the work”, I am starting a petition for people to express their discontent with the lack of representation of females and POC in the four-protagonist assassin line-up.

THE PETITION IS HERE 

If it reaches enough signatures, I will print it out and attach it to a letter which will illustrate to Ubisoft that their fans are not happy with their current lack of interest in representing anyone but the white male gamer. Nothing may happen, they may not even read it, but this is the only chance we have.

Thank you so much for your support.

Relevant to my dash’s interests.

on your left

summerlightning:

There’s a cyclist on your morning commute who thinks he’s hot shit.  Wrapped head to toe in neon green Lycra, he’s fond of clipping your handlebar at intersections as he passes you, and sometimes he reaches out to whap the back of your helmet as he zips by you on the bike path stretching between your campus and downtown.  “Fatass!” he yells at you almost every morning.

This morning you don’t see him for the first stretch of your commute, and you’re beginning to think you won’t see him at all—hurray!—when you hear his voice come yodeling down the lane:  “Move over, tubby!  Come on!”

He’s probably yelling at you as usual, but the woman pedaling along behind you doesn’t know that.  You hear her start to sob.

You’re a good distance ahead.  You brake at the light and the guy swings around the other lady, you can hear him coming, and he makes to turn in front of you and you feel his hand hit your helmet.  His fingernails rake your ear.

But you’re ready this time.  You may not be the world’s fastest cyclist—not yet—but you are an accomplished martial artist, and he probably weighs less than 130 pounds.  You grab his wrist and you wrench his stupid Lycra’d ass right off his bike, and with his momentum and a roll of your shoulder you send him sailing straight into the bank of grass next to the sidewalk.  He lands on his butt and back and sits up almost immediately, shrieking at you, yanking off his helmet, swinging his fists. 

“I’m going to call the police!” he says.  “That was assault!”

The other lady, her face still wet, pedals up beside you.  “Assault?” she says.  She reaches out to grab your hand.  She squeezes it and says, “Pardon me, but I saw you hit her first.”

The guy looks between the two of you.  There are more cyclists coming down the lane too, hollering concern—people who cry out your name, who love how you named your bike Shitty Shitty Bang Bang and who chatter with you at red lights.  People who will know the difference between assault and handing an asshat, well, both ass and hat. 

The guy picks himself up and picks his bike up too, saying nothing, but as he perches again on his saddle you warn him quietly, “Please don’t touch me again.  Next time I’ll aim for the asphalt.”

Most mass murderers do not go from zero to 60. Rodger made escalating assaults on women (splashing coffee on them, attempting to shove them off a ledge) before his killing spree. Both Cho and Justin-Jinich’s murderer harassed women before they killed anyone. When such acts go unnoticed and unpunished — because we expect men to harass women, and it’s not outrageous or even noteworthy when they do — they can become stepping-stones to more conspicuous and less socially acceptable acts of violence.

Raina Lipsitz

Interesting to note that while a history of animal cruelty is widely accepted to be a link with becoming a serial killer, the link between cruelty towards women and killing women is still up for debate. If a guy abuses a cat and then shoots women we say "we should have seen it coming that guy was nuts", but if abuses women and then shoots women we say "we had no way of seeing it coming that guy was a perfectly polite, kind and wonderful human 

(via marxisforbros)

(Source: cheekless0nion)

Frankly put. I am a FAKE GEEK GUY. I admit it. I like geek stuff, but I don’t love geek stuff. Not the way most geeks do. I’m an interloper on the geek scene. I’ve seen the movies, but I don’t know the canon. I am not a true fan.

All those things about not really loving the source material and “just watching the movies” or only reading the one book that everyone has read. That—all of that—applies to me.

But here are some things that have never happened to me. I have never been quizzed about who Data’s evil brother is to prove I like Star Trek. I have never had to justify my place in a midnight line to see Spider-man II by knowing who took up the mantle of Spider-man after Peter Parker’s death. (Peter Parker dies? Really? That’s so sad!) I have never had to explain who Nightwing is in order to participate in a conversation about Batman. (Nightwing is like….Robin on steroids, right?) I have never been asked how battle meditation works in order to voice my opinion that Enterprise shields would probably make a fight with Star Wars technology one sided. (Battle meditation is something that was in that Jedi role playing game, wasn’t it?) I have never had to beat everybody in the room (twice) at Mario Kart to prove I liked video games. I have never had my gender “honorarily” changed by having enough geek interests to be accepted (“you’re one of the guys now”). No one has ever insisted I tell them the difference between a tank and DPS in an MMORPG before allowing me to discuss raiding Molten Core. I have never been dismissed as a faker at a prequel screening because I didn’t know which admiral came out of light speed too close to the planet’s surface in The Empire Strikes Back. I have never been quizzed about Armor Class in order to get past someone who was blocking my path to the back of a game store where my friends were waiting at the tables. I have never been told I’m not a real fan. I have never been shamed for coming to a convention despite my lack of esoteric knowledge. And I have never, ever, EVER been invited to leave a fandom because I didn’t like [whatever it was] enough.

Every one of the things I have listed, I have personally witnessed happen. To women.

That’s not elitism. That’s sexism.
The “Fake Geek” is Not The Problem When It Comes to “Fake Geek Girls” (via brutereason)

I just heard from Ace of Geeks, where this was originally published. Looks like it’s getting reblogged all over the place, but the person who originally wrote it, and the site that originally published it, aren’t getting any credit.

That’s not cool, so: http://aceofgeeks.blogspot.com/2014/05/the-fake-geek-is-not-problem-when-it.html

In the 1930s, men’s nipples were just as provocative, shameful and taboo as women’s are now, and men were protesting in much the same way. In 1930, four men went topless to Coney Island and were arrested. In 1935, a flash mob of topless men descended upon Atlantic City, 42 of whom were arrested. Men fought and they were heard, changing not only laws but social consciousness. And by 1936, men’s bare chests were accepted as the norm.

So why is it that 80 years later women can’t seem to achieve the same for their chests? Why can’t a mother proudly breastfeed her child in public without feeling sexualized? why is a 17-year-old girl being asked to leave her own prom because a group of fathers find her too provocative?

[…] I am not trying to argue for mandatory toplessness, or even bralessness. What I am arguing for is a woman’s right to choose how she represents her body — and to make that choice based on personal desire and not a fear of how people will react to her or how society will judge her. No woman should be made to feel ashamed of her body.

Scout Willis, in XOJane, on Instagram’s nudity policy and why she recently strolled the NYC streets topless. Solid essay all around. I found this piece particularly interesting because I’d never heard about the men’s nipples thing. (via batmansymbol)
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